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Hot Leathers Patches Instructions

Patch Sewing Instructions: 

Note: Sewing by hand will give you greater control and is easier than trying to use a sewing machines when sewing into leather. 

Things you’ll need: tailor’s chalk, sewing pick (a.k.a. – seam ripper), upholstery needle, thimble, nylon thread (never use cotton thread for patches), leather spray adhesive (optional). All of these items should be available at your local sewing/craft store. 

  1. Identify exactly where you want the patch and outline with tailor’s chalk the position.
  2. Using your sewing pick, pick open the bottom seam of your jacket lining just enough that your hand can lift up inside the back of your jacket. Position your hand inside so it is resting flat between the lining and your outlined area. Use your outside hand to position the patch on the leather. You can lightly spray the back of the patch with the leather adhesive. This will hold your patch in place while you sew, but is not a permanent adhesive.
  3. Thread your upholstery needle using a strong nylon thread that matches your patch. Use your thimble to push the needle through the leather moving from inside the jacket to outside. This way, the knot will be on the inside of your jacket. Pull the needle out with your outside hand and back down through the patch and leather.
  4. Continue this pattern all the way around  the edge of your patch. Keep stitches close together and to the edge of your patch for the most secure attachment.
  5. Continue until you end up where you started. Then send the needle through the first stitch and loop it around a few times to make a finishing knot.
  6. Restitch the jacket lining when finished attaching the patch. 

Note that sewing on a patch will leave permanent holes on your jacket so be sure about placement of the patch before you start.

If you are unsure about sewing on a patch yourself, check with your local leather shop, shoe shop or seamstress/tailor to see if they will do it.

 

Patch Iron-On Instructions: 

All Hot Leathers patches feature a heat-sealed backing. This means that our patches may be ironed or sewn on to most clothes easily.

Sewing is still the most popular option for affixing patches. It allows for removal and reuse while keeping the patch firmly attached. Patches on leather MUST be sewn.

To iron your patch on yourself: 

  1. Preheat your iron to 325-335 degrees. Do not use steam.
  2. Press the area where you want your patch to be for 25 seconds.
  3. Position the patch on the garment so that it is where you want it to be when you’re done.
  4. Place a lightweight cloth over the patch. Using a back and forth motion, use medium pressure with the iron for 15 seconds. Iron should never come in direct contact with the patch.
  5. Carefully turn the garment right inside-out. Using a back and forth motion, firmly iron the inside  of the garment where your patch is for about a minute.
  6. Turn the garment right side out again. Use your clean, lightweight cloth to cover the patch. Iron the edges of the patch through the cloth to insure that they are thoroughly sealed.
  7. Let the garment cool completely before wearing. 

To the extent not prohibited by law, in no circumstances shall Hot Leathers be liable to you or any other third parties for any loss or damage arising directly or indirectly from your use of our inability to use, this site or any of the material contained in it. Hot Leathers makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with the respect to the blog postings or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reference you place on such material is therefore strictly at your own risk.